The Mail Must Get Through

The Mail Must Get Through

In Cameron Parish right now, post offices are turning lights back on.

These communities were hit first by hurricane Laura, and then by hurricane Delta. Both storms wreaked havoc on local infrastructure – one after the other. Documentation of the damage is horrifying, and cleanup will take a long time, not to mention recovery.

Many residents are afraid of longer-term problems such as an exodus from these neighborhoods, and how that will impact local business and infrastructure. Then again, what if additional big storms are battering the area next season? All of these unanswered questions have their chilling ramifications – and there are so many unknowns. It’s making people think about the future.

So many people are reevaluating their commitment to living in an area that’s been dramatically impacted by multiple storms this year. This is all while they’re sifting through the debris, looking at how much the storms have pushed their property around.

When you really sit and think about it, you see how this impacts lives. Out here in the regular world, in communities that are more shielded from a storm’s wrath, we’re talking about the post office as a utility and worrying about how many days it takes to get a package from one place to another. We’re worried that shakeups might impact the mail.

In Hackberry and related areas, something has already impacted the mail. Post office shutdowns were necessary because of the limitations imposed by massive storm damage. In other words, after a storm, things change. Especially a storm, or storms, of this magnitude. Everything from the utilities to the Postal Service has to be rebuilt, and that process is ongoing. For example, think about what happens to refrigeration systems. Those fortunate enough to have a generator can switch over. Everyone else is trying to get their meat and other perishables on ice. Supermarkets and stores are scrambling, so are households.

Even days or weeks after a storm surge has abated, the impact is still evident. Just take a look at their heroic efforts of some local businesses to get their doors open again, and you’ll see what these residents are dealing with. Will you donate money or time or resources to helping these embattled residents to dig out of the hole that Laura and Delta have created in their lives? It’s worth it, because we all live with the idea that in a terrible storm, we want to know that help is coming. We want to see the post offices and the restaurants and the shops back open again. You can help.

You can DONATE HERE to support our parent organizations efforts via its “Neighbors Helping Neighbors Program” as it relates to disaster relief and the hurricane damaged areas. Please mark your donation for “hurricane relief.”

We continue to have “boots on the ground” in many disaster stricken areas. And plan to for the foreseeable future. That being said the costs of all this continue, and the need for volunteers in many aspects is an never ending need. Consider how you can help us make a difference in those affected lives. EMAIL HERE to volunteer. (we need work from home support volunteers as well)

Part of activism is “being the change you want to see in your society and the world.” One excellent way to be that change is by getting involved in helping others make a difference in those in needs lives. Will you join with us in striving to make a difference?

Why activism is now more important than ever

Why activism is now more important than ever

For many Americans, the pressure has been building for a long time.

There are two major tracks that our country has been on for decades, and those are making activism more and more a vital part of our daily lives. Many people used to be able to just tune everything out and say that they were “apolitical.” Not so much right now.

The first critical trend here is political polarization. In general, as a society, we tend to no longer feel like we are unified in speaking with one voice. The civic values of the earlier part of the 20th century have given way to distrust, cynicism, scapegoating and in general, disagreements with our neighbors. The unfortunate dysfunction of government plays out between individuals who each have their own entrenched opinions. If you feel like your neighbors are a bunch of morons, you’re not alone. That’s part of how national politics is changing our world views.

The second trend, though, is even more directly applicable to how we live our lives, because it’s actively hurting working Americans in ways that we can’t ignore. It’s not just happening to “other people” either – it’s happening to all of us. If you work – you are labor!

Wage stagnation and the devaluation of labor have coincided with both corporate parties neglecting the needs of the worker in favor of managers and corporations. That’s not just a bunch of words. That’s a big deal for you and me.

A few decades ago, productivity stopped tracking with wages. To be specific, productivity went up, but wages stayed the same. The fruits of the American workers labor started to go, in large part, to shareholders and wealthy people accumulating money through capital gains. We had a general sense that it was kind of unfair, but too many of us were not paying attention.

We saw the corporate raiders of the 80s, and the venture capital funds of the 90s, and the restructuring vultures of the aughts, and we saw the American worker plunging down into a financial pit.

These trends are part of the reasons why activism is now so important in our social lives!

Back in the 1990s, a youth protest movement was targeting the WTO, which was part of global justice and a globalized economy.

But that seems quaint now, when our activism is directly targeted toward domestic policy as well.

Americans can’t pay the rent. They can’t get adequate health insurance based on their wages. So activism is now incredibly important. It’s the only way we can even protect our families financially. That’s different than the activism of past decades, which was more or less seen as a hobby or a frivolous bleeding heart kind of advocacy for people that we had never met halfway around the world.

Right now, Activism.Fyi is partnering with small businesses, small family farmers and American families to demand economic and social justice. Sign on, because if you’re not part of the 1%, you’re not at their table!